Tag Archives: Entrees: Poultry & Meat

A Mother’s Day Tribute

My  mother died on March 23, 2010.  She was a remarkable women. Here are three “notes” from At Home that that illustrate ways my mother influenced my understanding of home entertaining plus her recipe for Stuffed Cabbage.

‘Tis not the Food; ‘Tis the Appetite
In 1954 in our new home in the Crestwood section of Yonkers, my mother commissioned murals painted on her kitchen and pantry walls based upon illustrations in James Beard’s Fireside Cookbook. One of those illustrations is included in this book’s dedication. Another mural’s caption would daily remind me that “’Tis not the food but ’tis the appetite that makes eating a delight.”

My Bar Mitzvah
My two primary memories of my bar mitzvah are that my knees literally shook as I recited my havtorah and that the party afterward in my parents’ home was for family and friends of my parents. Setting a nice table and cooking well were always important to my mother. It was at her table that I first understood the nature of hospitality. But it was on my first day of Jewish adulthood that I learned that parties—even your own—are for other people.

Henny’s Girls
In 1979 my father died of a stroke on The Fountain’s golf course in Lake Worth, Florida; his ashes are scattered there. My mother, 10 years his junior, had years ahead of her and a new life to build. Her first summer as a widow, she journeyed to Williamstown, Massachusetts, with friends Nora and Beatie for a month in the Berkshires. Just before they left, my mother wondered if they were going to return next year to Williamstown, and if so, if she should buy a home rather than rent. By the next day, she owned a small Victorian fixer-upper next door to the Williams Inn. Every spring through fall for the next decade, she operated A House on Main Street, a small bed and breakfast. Later, tired of making bran muffins and ready for a change, she sold the inn. The following spring, she set up her warm-weather residence in Philadelphia, where other than me and my small family, she knew no one. Ever resourceful, my mother joined a group planning a Paris trip. (My mother is probably one of the few people who’s gone to Paris to meet Philadelphians.) It was at the trip’s reunion that she scanned the group, made up primarily of younger-than-her single women, and announced that every Sunday evening—a time she perceived as most lonely for singles—her table would be set for anyone who wanted to come. Thus was founded a group of wonderful women, self-named “Henny’s Girls,” whose common point of reference is my mother. My mother has enriched their lives with good food, like her stuffed cabbage and charred eggplant dip (see page 79) and lively conversation. They have, in turn, enriched her life with affection and devotion. Most recently, back in Lake Worth, she is working on establishing a chapter of Henny’s Girls South.

Henny’s Stuffed Cabbage
The night we opened Frog in 1973, my mother prepared her delicious sweet and sour stuffed cabbage rolls as Frog’s debut special. Over the years they have become a staple on our Rosh Hashanah menu, but there is no reason to restrict these wonderful morsels to that holiday. One roll makes for a nice first course; two or three for a filling entrée. Sometimes we make thumb-sized versions and serve them as hors d’oeuvres.
do ahead Stuffed cabbage is best when made at least one day ahead and reheated before serving. It can also be stored in the freezer for up to one month. Defrost and reheat in a 325º oven.

Cabbage Rolls
1⁄3 cup cooked white rice
1 large head green cabbage
6 gingersnaps
1⁄2 cup water
1 pound ground beef
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
1⁄2 cup ketchup

Sauce
1 cup chopped yellow onion
1 cup sauerkraut
15-ounce can whole tomatoes, drained
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1⁄2 cup light brown sugar
6 gingersnaps, crumbled
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon pepper
1⁄2 cup ketchup

1 Cut out the core of the cabbage and place in a pot. Nearly cover with water and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer until leaves can be parted easily, about 5 minutes. Remove cabbage, drain and peel off softer leaves. If inner leaves are still stiff, return to water and repeat. Pat leaves dry.
2 Make the filling: crumble gingersnaps in water to form a paste. In a bowl, combine paste, rice, beef, salt, brown sugar and ketchup.
3 To form the cabbage rolls, lay a leaf flat on a clean surface. Place about 3 tablespoons of mixture in the center of each leaf. Fold the two sides over the filling and then roll tightly and set aside, seam side down. Repeat with remaining ingredients, reserving the smaller leaves for the sauce.
4 Preheat oven to 350º. Chop reserved small cabbage leaves and set aside. Rinse sauerkraut well, squeeze out water and set aside. Gently squeeze tomatoes to remove some juice, then tear tomatoes apart.
5 To make the sauce, heat oil in a deep sauté pan and add onion. Cook until onion begins to brown, about 10 minutes. Chop reserved cabbage, add to pan and continue cooking until nicely browned, about 5-10 minutes more. Mix in sauerkraut, tomatoes, brown sugar, gingersnaps, salt and pepper. Continue cooking slowly for 15 minutes, adding water if it gets too thick.
6 To assemble, spoon half of the sauce into a baking dish. Place cabbage rolls in a single layer, seam side down. Cover with remaining sauce. Make a ribbon of ketchup across the top of the rolls. Cover with foil.
7 Bake for at least 2 hours. Remove foil after 1 hour and add as much as 1⁄2 cup water if cabbage appears too dry.
8 Serve hot or hold for one day and reheat in a 325º oven.
serves 6-8


After the core is removed, the whole cabbage head is briefly cooked in boiling war to soften leaves so that you can separate them from the head and roll. If removing  individual leaves becomes difficult, just return the head to boiling water again to further loosen leaves. Once removed from the head, if they are not soft enough to roll you can return them to the water to further soften.

It is important to pat dry the leaves. Dry leaves are easier to roll. Also, residue water could thin down the sauce.

Slowly saute onions until lightly browned and caramelized to bring out their maximum sweetness. Take care not to burn.


Cabbage leftover from the whole head — leaves too small to roll — get chopped and added to onions to be used in sauce.

Continue cooking until cabbage lightly browns.

The cabbage leaves will run the gamut from large outer leaves to smaller inner leaves. To make more uniform rolls you can use two small leaves together to make a larger roll. Try to keep the stuffing together and don’t worry too much of you have formed a perfect roll. As my mother used to say, “It all gets mixed up in the stomach.” If you want to make all smaller rolls, cut large leaves in half.

Here’s a very helpful tip: The outer leaves are best for making large cabbage rolls, but outer leaves tend to have very sturdy ribs that are difficult to soften without overcooking the leaves. To solve this problem, turn the leaves so that the inner side is face down and the outer side — now face up — exposes the sturdy rib. With a sharp knife, make a series of slits in the rib without cutting all the way through. Turn the leaf over and toll. The slits now make that much easier

Place a generous amount of sauce in over-proof baking dish.

Place cabbage rolls over sauce, top with move sauce and a ribbon of ketchup.

Cover with foil and bake for the initial two hours. Then remove foil, add some water if sauce appears  too thick and bake uncovered for an additional hour.

The finished product.

Next: Don’t Try This At Home: Behind the Scenes at the Dad Vail Regatta.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

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Choucroute Garnie Recipe

Choucroute garnie is a classic cold-weather tour de force. Making it well requires advance planning but no special skill, and you can’t help but feel proud placing this impressive display before your guests. (This is a recipe for a crowd, on the theory that if you’re going to this trouble, why not have a crowd enjoy it?) If you don’t have a very large pot, you can do the sautéing in batches in a skillet and transfer everything to a roasting pan covered with foil for the long oven cooking. The traditional accompaniment is boiled potatoes tossed with parsley.

do ahead Everything may be made up to five days ahead and stored in the refrigerator. Before serving, reheat, covered, in a 350° oven until hot, about 30-45 minutes.

12 ounces sliced bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces
11⁄2 pounds kielbasa, cut into 1-inch pieces
11⁄2 pounds bratwurst or knockwurst, cut into 3-inch lengths
2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced
2 cups carrots, peeled and cut into 1⁄2-inch slices
8 garlic cloves, crushed
4 pounds sauerkraut, rinsed well with water squeezed out
4 long lengths orange peel
3 smoked ham hocks
1⁄4 cup dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons juniper berries
2 tablespoons black peppercorns
2 teaspoons coriander seeds
3-4 pounds boneless pork butt or shoulder
4 bay leaves
3 fresh thyme sprigs
3 fresh parsley sprigs
2 fresh rosemary sprigs
2 fresh sage sprigs
31⁄4 cups white wine (ideally Riesling)
1 cups chicken stock
1⁄4 cup chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

1 Place ham hocks in a large pot and cover with water. Add brown sugar, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until meat is tender, about 11⁄2-2 hours. Allow to cool. Trim away skin and fat and cut meat into bite-sized pieces. Reserve 1 cup cooking liquid.
2 Make a bouquet garni by wrapping juniper berries, black peppercorns and coriander seeds in a small square of cheesecloth. Tie packet.
3 In a large Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, stir bacon over moderate heat to render fat and just cook through. With a slotted spoon, remove bacon and set it aside. In the residual fat, first brown kielbasa. Remove and brown bratwurst or other sausage. Remove and brown pork butt or shoulder. Be patient and brown everything well, leaving residual fat in the pot each time.
4 In the same pot with the same fat over moderate heat, sauté onions, carrots and garlic until onions lightly brown, about 20 minutes. Add sauerkraut, bacon, ham hocks, orange peel, bay leaves and the bouquet garni. Mix well.
5 Preheat oven to 300°. Place browned pork on top of sauerkraut mix. Place sprigs of thyme, parsley, rosemary and sage over top. Cover and bake until pork is very tender, about 3 hours. If serving right away, add kielbasa and bratwurst around the perimeter of pot to heat during the last 30 minutes of cooking.
6 Remove pork and set aside to cool. Remove and discard herbs, bouquet garni, orange peel and bay leaves.
7 To serve, cut pork into approximately 3⁄8-inch slices. Arrange sauerkraut on a large platter and arrange slices of pork down the middle; arrange sausages around pork. Sprinkle with chopped parsley. If you are serving potatoes and have a large enough platter, arrange potatoes around and just off the edge of the sauerkraut.
serves 10-12

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Chapter 12 – Poultry & Meat Entrees

The last chapter in Section 4More Elaborate Entrees is Chapter 12 — Poultry & Meat Entrees with fourteen recipes.

It’s hard to pick favorite recipes. But there are certain recipes in At Home that do have a particular association. Manou’s Boiled Chicken is one of a handful of recipes that come from special people in my life…but being a special person alone did not qualify for their recipe’s inclusion. It had to be a special recipe.

Picture 2

Manou’s Boiled Chicken with Ginger-Garlic Relish & Sticky Rice
This is about as far from your mother’s boiled chicken as Philadelphia is from Bangkok. Manou, a friend and also the wife of this book’s illustrator, Pascal, served this to us on a visit to Brussels. The chicken is removed from the bone and served with a potent swirl of chopped ginger and garlic. Simple, humble and delicious!

do ahead Chicken is best if made shortly before serving but it can be made up to two days ahead, refrigerated and refreshed in stock. Relish can be made up to four days in advance and stored in the refrigerator. Rice should be made just before serving.

1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced
1 cup small-cubed ginger
5 garlic cloves, crushed,
1 cup small-cubed garlic
1 cup fresh cilantro, rinsed and divided
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1⁄2 jalapeño, thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup chopped scallion
4-5 pound chicken
1⁄4 cup plus 3 tablespoons fish sauce, divided
1 tablespoons vegetable oil
11⁄2 teaspoons salt, sea salt preferred
3 cups jasmine rice or other long-grain rice

1 To cook chicken: Rinse chicken, place in a large pot and cover with at least 2 quarts water. Add sliced ginger, crushed garlic, 1⁄2 cup cilantro, chiles and 1⁄4 cup fish sauce. Bring to a slow boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Add back water as needed. Cook until meat falls off the bone, about 90 minutes. Remove chicken from pot and allow it to rest until it’s cool enough to handle. Remove skin and pull meat from bones, discarding bones. Skim fat from stock and set aside. You will use stock to make the relish and rice and to refresh chicken, so save at least 7 cups.
2 To make relish: In a small sauté pan, heat oil over moderate heat. Add cubed ginger and garlic and gently sauté to soften without browning, about 3 minutes. Add 3 tablespoons fish sauce and 1⁄2 cup reserved stock. Cook over moderate heat until liquid is reduced to a glaze, about 5 minutes. Set relish aside to cool.
3 To make rice: Rinse rice well in strainer until water runs clear. In a pot, combine rice with 41⁄2 cups reserved stock. Bring to a slow boil, cover, and reduce heat to very low until all water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving.
4 To serve: If chicken and stock are still warm, place chicken on platter and pour a little stock over it to moisten. If you cooked chicken well in advance and it is now cold, refresh chicken in a pot with stock over moderate heat until just warm. Add salt. Garnish with scallion and remaining cilantro leaves. Serve with relish and rice on the side.
serves 6

One of more than 300 side notes:

Entertaining
Entrées in Wide Soup Bowls
Variety, as they say, is the spice of life. Varying your dishes spices up the look of your food. We sometimes like to serve an entrée in a large wide soup bowl, which gives the presentation a bit of unexpected, restaurant style drama. Try it at home.

About 100 “bottom notes” are autobiographical:

The Sun Sets Over Jerusalem
Born into a family of assimilated Jews living in suburban New York, I felt little connection to my ethnic heritage. Ever travel-willing and curious, I joined a “mission” to Israel that a local organization was sponsoring. We’d been in the holy land for nearly a week when we headed to the mountain fortress of Masada, where legend has it that 960 Jews committed suicide rather than submit to the Roman Tenth Legion and accept Roman rule. After a brief float in the Dead Sea, we drove north through the Judean hills (of the Dead Sea Scrolls) toward Jerusalem. Our arrival there was carefully timed for Friday’s sunset, the beginning of shabbat and the procession of yeshiva students praying at the Western Wall—the surviving section of Solomon’s ancient temple and Judaism’s most sacred site. As the sun reached the horizon, our bus continued up hills straddling valleys with familiar Old and New Testament names. We turned a corner and suddenly below us was Jerusalem, a city with buildings of native pink stone. The glow of the setting sun reflecting in the pink stone created a light that can only be described as biblical and indelible.

Tomorrow: Countdown to shipping continues with the beginning of the preview of Section 5: Accompaniments with Chapter 13 — Room-Temperature Accompaniments and twenty-one guest-pleasing recipes.

A week from today the books will be on the road from Kentucky to me — all 66,000 pounds of them. That means just about two weeks to buy the book and receive a signed, numbered first edition.

Note: I will be speaking all about At Home — book and companion website — at the Free Library on Thursday, October 15 beginning at 7:30 PM. Hope to see you there.

Steve

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Manou’s Boiled Chicken with Ginger-Garlic Relish & Sticky Rice Recipe

This is about as far from your mother’s boiled chicken as Philadelphia is from Bangkok. Manou, a friend and also the wife of this book’s illustrator, Pascal, served this to us on a visit to Brussels. The chicken is removed from the bone and served with a potent swirl of chopped ginger and garlic. Simple, humble and delicious!

do ahead Chicken is best if made shortly before serving but it can be made up to two days ahead, refrigerated and refreshed in stock. Relish can be made up to four days in advance and stored in the refrigerator. Rice should be made just before serving.

1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced
1 cup small-cubed ginger
5 garlic cloves, crushed,
1 cup small-cubed garlic
1 cup fresh cilantro, rinsed and divided
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1⁄2 jalapeño, thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup chopped scallion
4-5 pound chicken
1⁄4 cup plus 3 tablespoons fish sauce, divided
1 tablespoons vegetable oil
11⁄2 teaspoons salt, sea salt preferred
3 cups jasmine rice or other long-grain rice

1 To cook chicken: Rinse chicken, place in a large pot and cover with at least 2 quarts water. Add sliced ginger, crushed garlic, 1⁄2 cup cilantro, chiles and 1⁄4 cup fish sauce. Bring to a slow boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Add back water as needed. Cook until meat falls off the bone, about 90 minutes. Remove chicken from pot and allow it to rest until it’s cool enough to handle. Remove skin and pull meat from bones, discarding bones. Skim fat from stock and set aside. You will use stock to make the relish and rice and to refresh chicken, so save at least 7 cups.
2 To make relish: In a small sauté pan, heat oil over moderate heat. Add cubed ginger and garlic and gently sauté to soften without browning, about 3 minutes. Add 3 tablespoons fish sauce and 1⁄2 cup reserved stock. Cook over moderate heat until liquid is reduced to a glaze, about 5 minutes. Set relish aside to cool.
3 To make rice: Rinse rice well in strainer until water runs clear. In a pot, combine rice with 41⁄2 cups reserved stock. Bring to a slow boil, cover, and reduce heat to very low until all water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving.
4 To serve: If chicken and stock are still warm, place chicken on platter and pour a little stock over it to moisten. If you cooked chicken well in advance and it is now cold, refresh chicken in a pot with stock over moderate heat until just warm. Add salt. Garnish with scallion and remaining cilantro leaves. Serve with relish and rice on the side.
serves 6

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Chapter 8 – Easy Entrees: From the Grill

Today I received a “dummy” of the At Home hardback book. It just had a white dust jacket, but I printed out a copy of the cover and glued it on. Inside was Section 7Sweet Endings — repeated over and over and over to make 512 pages. But the pages were the real thing. Not something I looked at on a screen or printed out on my HP inkjet printer. It weighed in at 3 1/2 gorgeous pounds! I also received the “scrips” — what I understand to be printer’s lingo for the printed pages folded together before they are cut and organized into the book. Again, the real thing — the actual printed pages in all their glory. Wait ’til you see this.

Down to 10 days to shipping. Today’s chapter preview countdown is Chapter 7Easy Entrees: From the Grill. From the Grill begins with a Mastering the Grill lesson, my advice for making you a better griller —  and ends with how to do a grill-based Asian Noodle Bar. It includes a chart of marinades and recipes for a boatload of international marinades along with side notes that highlight the “flavor profiles” of a spectrum of international cuisines. In between there are 17 grill-based recipes. Quite a lot.

My recipe for today is Thai Thighs. Lots of grill recipes competed for space in this chapter, but I could not resist including a recipe named Thai Thighs. It includes two things I love – Thai flavors and chicken thighs. I know breast-people outnumber thigh-people — and we have a host of chicken breast recipes in the book, but I am pleased to say we have several chicken thigh recipes. Thighs are much more flavorful than breasts, juicer and are wonderful boned with skin removed as they are here.

Thai Thighs
Chicken thighs pack far more flavor than breasts and are much more forgiving of overcooking. They take to the grill particularly well. Given their low price and myriad assets, they’re pitifully underutilized. The sugar in this marinade makes for an extra level of caramelization—and a messy grill. You can also use any of the marinades in this chapter and follow the marinating and grilling procedure below.

do ahead Thighs can be marinated up to three days ahead. It’s best to cook them the day you are serving them.

2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1 jalapeño, seeded, ribbed and sliced
1⁄3 cup lime juice
1 stalk lemongrass
1⁄4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
leaves from 5-6 fresh cilantro sprigs (optional)

1 lime, cut into 6 or 8 wedges, for garnish
1 Cut the root tip and dry end of the lemongrass stalk, leaving a length of about 8-10 inches. Peel away the outer leaves, leaving the tender core. Finely chop.
2 Combine lemongrass with ginger, garlic, chiles, lime juice, sugar, fish sauce, oil, salt and pepper and mix well. Add chicken. Toss well and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
3 Just before grilling, add oil to marinade. Preheat grill to medium-high. Remove chicken from marinade, and allow marinade to drain off, but don’t wipe it dry. Place chicken on grill, smooth side up, and grill until nicely charred, about 4 minutes. Turn and grill the other side, about 4-5 minutes. Serve whole or thinly sliced, either hot or at room temperature. Serve with lime wedges. Tear cilantro and sprinkle it over the chicken.
serves 6-8

Ingredients
Flavor Profiles: Thai
Though strongly influenced by its towering neighbor, China, Thai food has maintained a distinctive flavor profile, relying on the widest range of herbs and aromatics. As with all the foods of Southeast Asia, the balance of sweet, sour, hot and salty is critical.
Ingredients include:
Lemongrass
Kaffir lime
Garlic
Fresh ginger
Galangal
Basils
Cilantro
Sugar
Rice vinegar
Lime juice
Shrimp paste
Coconut milk
Fresh chiles
Fish sauce

Picture 3

Another delightful Pascal illustration.

Tomorrow: Chapter 9 – Easy Entrees: Condiments.

Just about two weeks left to order the book to receive a signed and numbered first edition.

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Thai Thighs Recipe

Chicken thighs pack far more flavor than breasts and are much more forgiving of overcooking. They take to the grill particularly well. Given their low price and myriad assets, they’re pitifully underutilized. The sugar in this marinade makes for an extra level of caramelization—and a messy grill. You can also use any of the marinades in this chapter and follow the marinating and grilling procedure below.

do ahead Thighs can be marinated up to three days ahead. It’s best to cook them the day you are serving them.

2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1 jalapeño, seeded, ribbed and sliced
1⁄3 cup lime juice
1 stalk lemongrass
1⁄4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
leaves from 5-6 fresh cilantro sprigs (optional)

1 lime, cut into 6 or 8 wedges, for garnish
1 Cut the root tip and dry end of the lemongrass stalk, leaving a length of about 8-10 inches. Peel away the outer leaves, leaving the tender core. Finely chop.
2 Combine lemongrass with ginger, garlic, chiles, lime juice, sugar, fish sauce, oil, salt and pepper and mix well. Add chicken. Toss well and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
3 Just before grilling, add oil to marinade. Preheat grill to medium-high. Remove chicken from marinade, and allow marinade to drain off, but don’t wipe it dry. Place chicken on grill, smooth side up, and grill until nicely charred, about 4 minutes. Turn and grill the other side, about 4-5 minutes. Serve whole or thinly sliced, either hot or at room temperature. Serve with lime wedges. Tear cilantro and sprinkle it over the chicken.
serves 6-8

Ingredients
Flavor Profiles: Thai
Though strongly influenced by its towering neighbor, China, Thai food has maintained a distinctive flavor profile, relying on the widest range of herbs and aromatics. As with all the foods of Southeast Asia, the balance of sweet, sour, hot and salty is critical.
Ingredients include:
Lemongrass
Kaffir lime
Garlic
Fresh ginger
Galangal
Basils
Cilantro
Sugar
Rice vinegar
Lime juice
Shrimp paste
Coconut milk
Fresh chiles
Fish sauce

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Chapter 7 — Easy Entrees:Roasts

Our countdown to shipping continues with 12 more chapters to preview. You have about 16 days left to pre-order the book to receive a signed and numbered first edition of At Home by Steve Poses: A Caterer’s Guide to Cooking & Entertaining.

We have divided entrees into two sections. The first entree section is Section 3 is Easy Entrees & Condiments. Section 4 is More Elaborate Entrees. Section 3 begins with Chapter 7 — Easy Entrees: Roasts. The chapter has 19 recipes that start with Gracie’s Salt & Pepper Roast Chicken and ends with Glazed Tofu Roast with Shitakes & Spring Onions.  Section 5 features More Elaborate Entrees.

Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder
Infused with Lime, Garlic & Thyme

This roast ends up with a crispy layer of skin on the outside and fall-apart tender meat on the inside. Most of the time here is inactive but the roast benefits from occasional basting. Serve with Spanish rice or in tortillas with chopped fresh cilantro, grilled pineapple and salsa verde.

do ahead Pork can be roasted up to three days in advance and stored, covered, in the refrigerator. Reheat, covered in foil, in a 200° oven or serve at room temperature.

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 head garlic, broken into cloves and peeled
2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
4 limes, halved and seeded
5-7 pounds boneless pork butt or shoulder
2-3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper
6-8 generous fresh thyme sprigs

1 Preheat oven to 200°.
2 Place pork in a shallow roasting pan. In a small bowl, combine chopped garlic, salt and pepper to form a paste. Rub mixture all over the roast, working it into some of the natural crevasses in the meat. Place onions in roasting pan and lay pork over onion. Tuck some thyme sprigs into the crevasses in the meat as well and place some under and around the roast. Squeeze limes over the roast and add lime halves to the pan, cut side down. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and poke some holes into the foil. Roast until meat collapses, about 10-12 hours. After several hours, occasionally check roast to make sure there is some moisture left in the pan. If not, add a little water. Baste occasionally with the juices.
serves 8-12

Ingredients
Cheaper Eats: Slow-Roasted Shoulders
One of the joys of winter weekends in the Northeast is that there’s no yard work to do. No weeds to pull, no lawn to mow, no leaves to rake. And because it’s cold outside, you don’t mind having your oven on inside. These are ideal days for meat shoulders. Shoulders are inexpensive because they have lots of connective tissue, fat and marbling, and require long cooking to break down the fiber that makes the cut tough. Very slowly roasting a beef, lamb or veal shoulder at around 200° for six to eight hours with lots of aromatics and just a little liquid produces a deliciously succulent product that essentially collapses onto itself as it cooks. The technique is similar to braising, but it produces a more concentrated flavor. It also fills your home for hours with fragrance and anticipation.

Picture 2

A note about the book’s colors: Maria Demopoulos, our Art Director has designed a gloriously and smartly colored book. I have used today’s post to imperfectly demonstrate the use of color. It’s far better in the book! Color is used to help you know where you are in the book and helps to make it a “guide.” Each of the seven recipe sections is distinguished by a different accent color and that color. That color is used for the type of the recipe titles, the ingredient list and at the bottom of the left handed pages we let you know what section you are in and the right-hand page tells you what chapter you are in. All notes – both side and bottom are purple throughout the book. Part 1’s accent color is purple.

Tomorrow: Easy Entrees: From the Grill

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