Tag Archives: Entrees: Poultry & Meat

Manou’s Boiled Chicken with Ginger-Garlic Relish & Sticky Rice Recipe

This is about as far from your mother’s boiled chicken as Philadelphia is from Bangkok. Manou, a friend and also the wife of this book’s illustrator, Pascal, served this to us on a visit to Brussels. The chicken is removed from the bone and served with a potent swirl of chopped ginger and garlic. Simple, humble and delicious!

do ahead Chicken is best if made shortly before serving but it can be made up to two days ahead, refrigerated and refreshed in stock. Relish can be made up to four days in advance and stored in the refrigerator. Rice should be made just before serving.

1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced
1 cup small-cubed ginger
5 garlic cloves, crushed,
1 cup small-cubed garlic
1 cup fresh cilantro, rinsed and divided
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1⁄2 jalapeño, thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup chopped scallion
4-5 pound chicken
1⁄4 cup plus 3 tablespoons fish sauce, divided
1 tablespoons vegetable oil
11⁄2 teaspoons salt, sea salt preferred
3 cups jasmine rice or other long-grain rice

1 To cook chicken: Rinse chicken, place in a large pot and cover with at least 2 quarts water. Add sliced ginger, crushed garlic, 1⁄2 cup cilantro, chiles and 1⁄4 cup fish sauce. Bring to a slow boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Add back water as needed. Cook until meat falls off the bone, about 90 minutes. Remove chicken from pot and allow it to rest until it’s cool enough to handle. Remove skin and pull meat from bones, discarding bones. Skim fat from stock and set aside. You will use stock to make the relish and rice and to refresh chicken, so save at least 7 cups.
2 To make relish: In a small sauté pan, heat oil over moderate heat. Add cubed ginger and garlic and gently sauté to soften without browning, about 3 minutes. Add 3 tablespoons fish sauce and 1⁄2 cup reserved stock. Cook over moderate heat until liquid is reduced to a glaze, about 5 minutes. Set relish aside to cool.
3 To make rice: Rinse rice well in strainer until water runs clear. In a pot, combine rice with 41⁄2 cups reserved stock. Bring to a slow boil, cover, and reduce heat to very low until all water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving.
4 To serve: If chicken and stock are still warm, place chicken on platter and pour a little stock over it to moisten. If you cooked chicken well in advance and it is now cold, refresh chicken in a pot with stock over moderate heat until just warm. Add salt. Garnish with scallion and remaining cilantro leaves. Serve with relish and rice on the side.
serves 6

Leave a comment

Filed under Family and Friends, Recipes

Chapter 8 – Easy Entrees: From the Grill

Today I received a “dummy” of the At Home hardback book. It just had a white dust jacket, but I printed out a copy of the cover and glued it on. Inside was Section 7Sweet Endings — repeated over and over and over to make 512 pages. But the pages were the real thing. Not something I looked at on a screen or printed out on my HP inkjet printer. It weighed in at 3 1/2 gorgeous pounds! I also received the “scrips” — what I understand to be printer’s lingo for the printed pages folded together before they are cut and organized into the book. Again, the real thing — the actual printed pages in all their glory. Wait ’til you see this.

Down to 10 days to shipping. Today’s chapter preview countdown is Chapter 7Easy Entrees: From the Grill. From the Grill begins with a Mastering the Grill lesson, my advice for making you a better griller —  and ends with how to do a grill-based Asian Noodle Bar. It includes a chart of marinades and recipes for a boatload of international marinades along with side notes that highlight the “flavor profiles” of a spectrum of international cuisines. In between there are 17 grill-based recipes. Quite a lot.

My recipe for today is Thai Thighs. Lots of grill recipes competed for space in this chapter, but I could not resist including a recipe named Thai Thighs. It includes two things I love – Thai flavors and chicken thighs. I know breast-people outnumber thigh-people — and we have a host of chicken breast recipes in the book, but I am pleased to say we have several chicken thigh recipes. Thighs are much more flavorful than breasts, juicer and are wonderful boned with skin removed as they are here.

Thai Thighs
Chicken thighs pack far more flavor than breasts and are much more forgiving of overcooking. They take to the grill particularly well. Given their low price and myriad assets, they’re pitifully underutilized. The sugar in this marinade makes for an extra level of caramelization—and a messy grill. You can also use any of the marinades in this chapter and follow the marinating and grilling procedure below.

do ahead Thighs can be marinated up to three days ahead. It’s best to cook them the day you are serving them.

2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1 jalapeño, seeded, ribbed and sliced
1⁄3 cup lime juice
1 stalk lemongrass
1⁄4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
leaves from 5-6 fresh cilantro sprigs (optional)

1 lime, cut into 6 or 8 wedges, for garnish
1 Cut the root tip and dry end of the lemongrass stalk, leaving a length of about 8-10 inches. Peel away the outer leaves, leaving the tender core. Finely chop.
2 Combine lemongrass with ginger, garlic, chiles, lime juice, sugar, fish sauce, oil, salt and pepper and mix well. Add chicken. Toss well and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
3 Just before grilling, add oil to marinade. Preheat grill to medium-high. Remove chicken from marinade, and allow marinade to drain off, but don’t wipe it dry. Place chicken on grill, smooth side up, and grill until nicely charred, about 4 minutes. Turn and grill the other side, about 4-5 minutes. Serve whole or thinly sliced, either hot or at room temperature. Serve with lime wedges. Tear cilantro and sprinkle it over the chicken.
serves 6-8

Ingredients
Flavor Profiles: Thai
Though strongly influenced by its towering neighbor, China, Thai food has maintained a distinctive flavor profile, relying on the widest range of herbs and aromatics. As with all the foods of Southeast Asia, the balance of sweet, sour, hot and salty is critical.
Ingredients include:
Lemongrass
Kaffir lime
Garlic
Fresh ginger
Galangal
Basils
Cilantro
Sugar
Rice vinegar
Lime juice
Shrimp paste
Coconut milk
Fresh chiles
Fish sauce

Picture 3

Another delightful Pascal illustration.

Tomorrow: Chapter 9 – Easy Entrees: Condiments.

Just about two weeks left to order the book to receive a signed and numbered first edition.

Leave a comment

Filed under At Home News, Recipes, Tips

Thai Thighs Recipe

Chicken thighs pack far more flavor than breasts and are much more forgiving of overcooking. They take to the grill particularly well. Given their low price and myriad assets, they’re pitifully underutilized. The sugar in this marinade makes for an extra level of caramelization—and a messy grill. You can also use any of the marinades in this chapter and follow the marinating and grilling procedure below.

do ahead Thighs can be marinated up to three days ahead. It’s best to cook them the day you are serving them.

2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
2 bird’s-eye chiles or 1 jalapeño, seeded, ribbed and sliced
1⁄3 cup lime juice
1 stalk lemongrass
1⁄4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
leaves from 5-6 fresh cilantro sprigs (optional)

1 lime, cut into 6 or 8 wedges, for garnish
1 Cut the root tip and dry end of the lemongrass stalk, leaving a length of about 8-10 inches. Peel away the outer leaves, leaving the tender core. Finely chop.
2 Combine lemongrass with ginger, garlic, chiles, lime juice, sugar, fish sauce, oil, salt and pepper and mix well. Add chicken. Toss well and refrigerate for 2-3 hours.
3 Just before grilling, add oil to marinade. Preheat grill to medium-high. Remove chicken from marinade, and allow marinade to drain off, but don’t wipe it dry. Place chicken on grill, smooth side up, and grill until nicely charred, about 4 minutes. Turn and grill the other side, about 4-5 minutes. Serve whole or thinly sliced, either hot or at room temperature. Serve with lime wedges. Tear cilantro and sprinkle it over the chicken.
serves 6-8

Ingredients
Flavor Profiles: Thai
Though strongly influenced by its towering neighbor, China, Thai food has maintained a distinctive flavor profile, relying on the widest range of herbs and aromatics. As with all the foods of Southeast Asia, the balance of sweet, sour, hot and salty is critical.
Ingredients include:
Lemongrass
Kaffir lime
Garlic
Fresh ginger
Galangal
Basils
Cilantro
Sugar
Rice vinegar
Lime juice
Shrimp paste
Coconut milk
Fresh chiles
Fish sauce

Leave a comment

Filed under Recipes, Tips

Chapter 7 — Easy Entrees:Roasts

Our countdown to shipping continues with 12 more chapters to preview. You have about 16 days left to pre-order the book to receive a signed and numbered first edition of At Home by Steve Poses: A Caterer’s Guide to Cooking & Entertaining.

We have divided entrees into two sections. The first entree section is Section 3 is Easy Entrees & Condiments. Section 4 is More Elaborate Entrees. Section 3 begins with Chapter 7 — Easy Entrees: Roasts. The chapter has 19 recipes that start with Gracie’s Salt & Pepper Roast Chicken and ends with Glazed Tofu Roast with Shitakes & Spring Onions.  Section 5 features More Elaborate Entrees.

Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder
Infused with Lime, Garlic & Thyme

This roast ends up with a crispy layer of skin on the outside and fall-apart tender meat on the inside. Most of the time here is inactive but the roast benefits from occasional basting. Serve with Spanish rice or in tortillas with chopped fresh cilantro, grilled pineapple and salsa verde.

do ahead Pork can be roasted up to three days in advance and stored, covered, in the refrigerator. Reheat, covered in foil, in a 200° oven or serve at room temperature.

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 head garlic, broken into cloves and peeled
2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
4 limes, halved and seeded
5-7 pounds boneless pork butt or shoulder
2-3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper
6-8 generous fresh thyme sprigs

1 Preheat oven to 200°.
2 Place pork in a shallow roasting pan. In a small bowl, combine chopped garlic, salt and pepper to form a paste. Rub mixture all over the roast, working it into some of the natural crevasses in the meat. Place onions in roasting pan and lay pork over onion. Tuck some thyme sprigs into the crevasses in the meat as well and place some under and around the roast. Squeeze limes over the roast and add lime halves to the pan, cut side down. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and poke some holes into the foil. Roast until meat collapses, about 10-12 hours. After several hours, occasionally check roast to make sure there is some moisture left in the pan. If not, add a little water. Baste occasionally with the juices.
serves 8-12

Ingredients
Cheaper Eats: Slow-Roasted Shoulders
One of the joys of winter weekends in the Northeast is that there’s no yard work to do. No weeds to pull, no lawn to mow, no leaves to rake. And because it’s cold outside, you don’t mind having your oven on inside. These are ideal days for meat shoulders. Shoulders are inexpensive because they have lots of connective tissue, fat and marbling, and require long cooking to break down the fiber that makes the cut tough. Very slowly roasting a beef, lamb or veal shoulder at around 200° for six to eight hours with lots of aromatics and just a little liquid produces a deliciously succulent product that essentially collapses onto itself as it cooks. The technique is similar to braising, but it produces a more concentrated flavor. It also fills your home for hours with fragrance and anticipation.

Picture 2

A note about the book’s colors: Maria Demopoulos, our Art Director has designed a gloriously and smartly colored book. I have used today’s post to imperfectly demonstrate the use of color. It’s far better in the book! Color is used to help you know where you are in the book and helps to make it a “guide.” Each of the seven recipe sections is distinguished by a different accent color and that color. That color is used for the type of the recipe titles, the ingredient list and at the bottom of the left handed pages we let you know what section you are in and the right-hand page tells you what chapter you are in. All notes – both side and bottom are purple throughout the book. Part 1’s accent color is purple.

Tomorrow: Easy Entrees: From the Grill

Leave a comment

Filed under At Home News, Recipes, Tips

Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder Infused with Lime, Garlic & Thyme Recipe

This roast ends up with a crispy layer of skin on the outside and fall-apart tender meat on the inside. Most of the time here is inactive but the roast benefits from occasional basting. Serve with Spanish rice or in tortillas with chopped fresh cilantro, grilled pineapple and salsa verde.

do ahead Pork can be roasted up to three days in advance and stored, covered, in the refrigerator. Reheat, covered in foil, in a 200° oven or serve at room temperature.

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 head garlic, broken into cloves and peeled
2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
4 limes, halved and seeded
5-7 pounds boneless pork butt or shoulder
2-3 tablespoons salt
1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper
6-8 generous fresh thyme sprigs

1 Preheat oven to 200°.
2 Place pork in a shallow roasting pan. In a small bowl, combine chopped garlic, salt and pepper to form a paste. Rub mixture all over the roast, working it into some of the natural crevasses in the meat. Place onions in roasting pan and lay pork over onion. Tuck some thyme sprigs into the crevasses in the meat as well and place some under and around the roast. Squeeze limes over the roast and add lime halves to the pan, cut side down. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and poke some holes into the foil. Roast until meat collapses, about 10-12 hours. After several hours, occasionally check roast to make sure there is some moisture left in the pan. If not, add a little water. Baste occasionally with the juices.
serves 8-12

Ingredients
Cheaper Eats: Slow-Roasted Shoulders
One of the joys of winter weekends in the Northeast is that there’s no yard work to do. No weeds to pull, no lawn to mow, no leaves to rake. And because it’s cold outside, you don’t mind having your oven on inside. These are ideal days for meat shoulders. Shoulders are inexpensive because they have lots of connective tissue, fat and marbling, and require long cooking to break down the fiber that makes the cut tough. Very slowly roasting a beef, lamb or veal shoulder at around 200° for six to eight hours with lots of aromatics and just a little liquid produces a deliciously succulent product that essentially collapses onto itself as it cooks. The technique is similar to braising, but it produces a more concentrated flavor. It also fills your home for hours with fragrance and anticipation.

Picture 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Recipes

Chapter 10 – Braises, Casseroles & One-Dish Entrees

Today is a preview from Chapter 10 — Braises, Casseroles & One-Dish Entrees. It’s a little out of order in our 19-day, 19-chapter countdown to the book being shipped from the Quebecor World printing facility in Kentucky. Rosh Hashana is now only a week away and you could happily go out and buy your brisket today, cook it tomorrow as you watch the Eagles season opener – or someone you love is watching it and you’re not interested! Smart home entertainers plan ahead and do ahead and made ahead brisket is better than made just in time.

So, from Chapter 10:

Holiday-Ready Brisket

Pot-roasted beef brisket with tomato and caramelized onion, traditionally served at Jewish holiday dinners, is also great for any kind of dinner party. It’s easy to make, mostly requiring passive cooking time, and one brisket can feed a crowd. If you can find a second-cut brisket—the fattier but more flavorful cut—it’s preferable, but a first-cut brisket will do.

do ahead Brisket is better made at least a day before it is served and it can be made as much as three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator. Skim off fat and reheat in the oven before serving. It also freezes well.

3 yellow onions, thinly sliced
4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
5 pounds beef brisket (preferably second-cut)
11⁄2 teaspoons salt
1⁄2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups canned crushed Italian tomatoes
2 bay leaves
1⁄2 cup red wine
10.5-ounce can low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

1 Preheat oven to 375º. Pat brisket dry. Season brisket on all sides with salt, pepper and paprika. Heat oil in a Dutch oven or very large ovenproof pot. Add brisket and cook until well browned, about 10 minutes. Turn and repeat on the other side. You may have to cut brisket into two pieces to fit it into your pot.
2 Transfer brisket from pot to a plate. Add onions to the pot and cook until softened, about 10-12 minutes. Add brisket and any juices it has released back to the pot. Add carrots, garlic, tomato, bay leaves, wine, beef broth, sugar and flour to pot and stir evenly.
3 Cover pot and cook in the oven until tender, about 3-31⁄2 hours. Check brisket a few times during cooking; add a cup of water if sauce appears dry.
4 Allow brisket to rest 30 minutes before serving, then slice thinly against the grain. Spoon sauce and vegetables over meat and serve.
serves 8-10

Here’s a side Ingredient note that waxes a touch philosophical — food for thought.

Ingredients
Cooking is a Little Like Travel
You can visit new foods and flavors much the same way as you visit new cities and countries. One of the joys of travel is the excitement of shared discovery with someone you love. It’s also exciting to introduce them to a wonderful place you’ve been before. The same can be said of cooking. There’s great joy in sharing an ingredient or flavor. I hope this book introduces you to new food experiences and that you can then share them with others.

And a Pascal Lemaitre illustration.

Picture 1

Thirteen days from the book being shipped. To all those who have bought the book — and with it gained access to At Home Online — thank you. And if you haven’t bought the book, what are you waiting for?

Tomorrow I return to chapter order with Chapter 5 — Tossed Salads & Dressings.

Steve

Leave a comment

Filed under At Home News, Holidays, Recipes, Tips

Holiday-Ready Brisket Recipe

Pot-roasted beef brisket with tomato and caramelized onion, traditionally served at Jewish holiday dinners, is also great for any kind of dinner party. It’s easy to make, mostly requiring passive cooking time, and one brisket can feed a crowd. If you can find a second-cut brisket—the fattier but more flavorful cut—it’s preferable, but a first-cut brisket will do.

do ahead Brisket is better made at least a day before it is served and it can be made as much as three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator. Skim off fat and reheat in the oven before serving. It also freezes well.

3 yellow onions, thinly sliced
4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
5 pounds beef brisket (preferably second-cut)
11⁄2 teaspoons salt
1⁄2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups canned crushed Italian tomatoes
2 bay leaves
1⁄2 cup red wine
10.5-ounce can low-sodium beef broth
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

1 Preheat oven to 375º. Pat brisket dry. Season brisket on all sides with salt, pepper and paprika. Heat oil in a Dutch oven or very large ovenproof pot. Add brisket and cook until well browned, about 10 minutes. Turn and repeat on the other side. You may have to cut brisket into two pieces to fit it into your pot.
2 Transfer brisket from pot to a plate. Add onions to the pot and cook until softened, about 10-12 minutes. Add brisket and any juices it has released back to the pot. Add carrots, garlic, tomato, bay leaves, wine, beef broth, sugar and flour to pot and stir evenly.
3 Cover pot and cook in the oven until tender, about 3-31⁄2 hours. Check brisket a few times during cooking; add a cup of water if sauce appears dry.
4 Allow brisket to rest 30 minutes before serving, then slice thinly against the grain. Spoon sauce and vegetables over meat and serve.
serves 8-10

Leave a comment

Filed under Holidays, Recipes