5 Days in Lisbon: Walk. Eat. Sleep. Repeat. Day Three

This is the third in a series of five posts.
Day One
Day  Two

Overview: On our third day we explored Chaido, a neighborhood that is adjacent to Bairro Alto. Lunch was at a traditional Portuguese restaurant two blocks from our apartment. An early dinner at the highly regarded Alma. A late night stroll through Alfama to discover fado.

We had perfect weather during our five-day June visit to Lisbon. Each day the skies were clear and blue with occasional wisps of clouds. Temperatures were warm and humidity low. Perfect walking weather. Day Three was the midway point in our five-day trip. By Day Three we were beginning to feel at home. We loved our street and our neighborhood. We were comfortable in our apartment.  The path to and from was now familiar. Day Three was our sweet spot. Day Four – the day before we have to leave — will likely be filled with anticipatory sadness of that accompanies endings.

By Day Three we were also clear that we enjoyed one an others traveling company. From an early age Noah and I had traveled extensively together from Bangkok to London, Jamaica and the Virgin Islands to Boston, LA and Seattle. And then there was Las Vegas — Noah’s favorite place  — where we visited many times including celebrating his twenty-first birthday. Christina traveled the world in her capacity as Managing Director of White Oak Dance Company. But our world travel together was limited. Because of my weight and the difficulty I had walking for hours on end, my mobility was more limited than either of us would have wished on our travels together. The loss of seventy pounds since Thanksgiving, coupled with five day-a-week travels to the gym has transformed my traveling life as it has so many other things. So the three of us were reasonably in sync with our walk, eat, sleep, repeat routine. Life is good.

Day Three Walk: Chaido

Our Day Three walk was mildly informed by some shopping goals. I say mildly because mostly what we wanted was a few destination to define our path rather than any compelling need for more stuff. Lisbon is more a walker’s paradise than a shopper’s paradise. Noah wanted a Portuguese cookbook — but not in Portuguese. I noted a shop that carried cutlery. Christina’s shopping interests included linens, china/silver and gloves. Using my iPad, I plotted a “shopping route” through Chaido and off we went.

Largo de Camoes (Camoes Square) is the transition point between our neighborhood of Bairro Alto and Chaido, the adjacent neighborhood.

Across Largo Square on Rua Garrett, a pedestrian only thoroughfare, are several cafes with outdoor seating. Rua Garrett is Chaido’s main street.

Among the cafes is A Brasileira, one of Lisbon’s oldest. This was were Christina and Noah had their late morning coffee. Rua Garrett crosses Rua do Alcecim, the street that leads down to the river to the Cais do Sodre transportation hub and the Ribeira Food Market that is across the street from Cais do Sodre.

Chaido is noted in guidebooks as Lisbon’s most chic neighborhood. “Most chic” is a relative term. One of the things I like most about Lisbon is its general lack of pretense. While there are places that would qualify as chic nearly anywhere such as Largo, last night’s restaurant, in general I would not characterize Lisbon, including Chaido, as chic.

Flower stalls do not line Lisbon’s sidewalks, but here is a lovely flower shop.

Ourivesaria Alianca is a fine jewelry shop on Rua Garrett that called out to Christina.

Many shop windows displayed the signature “sardine” of the Festival of Lisbon

Walking a new city is a process of exploration and discovery. What’s over this hill?

And what awaits around the corner?

Or up those stairs?

Chaido runs from high on a hill…

…down to the waterfront and Cais do Sodre, an important transportation hub. The hills add immeasurably to Lisbon’s interest.

This building is not typical. Most of the buildings are far simpler with mostly stucco facades painted in neutral colors.

Occasionally you see buildings painted with vivid colors.

When I began walking with my camera’s eye, I thought I would focus on Lisbon’s wall tiles. I did this, but I began to be visually intrigued by the ubiquitous graffiti. Day Five’s post will focus on Lisbon’s wall tiles and graffiti.

Our walk down through Chaida lead us down to the edge of Baixa.

Returning to Chaido on the way back to our apartment in Bairro Alto, we came upon this cafe dramatically positioned in a courtyard. You just can’t do it all, so after a brief peek, we headed home to rest for dinner. As for our shopping goals, not too successful, but that hardly mattered.

Day Two Eat: Lunch at 1 de Maio, a traditional neighborhood restaurant in Bairro Alto and dinner at Alma, a high style in the Santos neighborhood.

The rhythm of our days and evenings placed walking in the afternoon. Mornings were about sleeping…at least for some of us. It was rare we made it out of our apartment before late morning. Breakfast was mostly just coffee and maybe some fruit so we could have lunch early enough in the day to have a big block of time to walk and explore.

On our third day we wanted a light, local and inexpensive lunch. We settled on 1 de Maio, a few blocks from our apartment. Bairro Alto’s back streets are filled with small restaurants, bars and fado clubs.

1 de Maio offers simple, traditional Portuguese fare and was exactly what we had in mind.

Part of the joy of dining is sampling wines unlikely to be available in your own neighborhood restaurant. Here we enjoyed an inexpensive Portuguese red blend with the curious name of .com. The wine’s producer is Tiago Cabaco, from Estremoz, in the Alentejo region. Its principal grape is the local Touriga Nacional. Just right for lunch.

1 de Maio, Rua da Atalia, 8, Bairro Alto

Dinner at ALMA
Lisbon has no shortage of restaurant choices. We had narrowed our focus to non-traditional, high style restaurants offering modern interpretations of Portuguese food. That still left us with more options than our five-day schedule allowed and since we had decided to return to 100 Maneiras on our final evening, we were down to two dinners. As we had not made a decision before starting our day, it was not until we returned from our afternoon walk that we began to identify our dinner destination. We settled on Alma, on most lists of “Best Restaurants.” When we called for a reservation, we learned that the only time available was relatively early in the evening. After our fairly light lunch and long walk, early seemed OK. As it turned out, early also enabled us to have a post-dinner fado adventure.

Alma’s chef-owner is Henrique Sa Pessoa, one of a small band of young Lisbon chef’s who have updated Lisbon’s traditional restaurant scene. Trip Advisor ranks Alma #9 of 584 restaurants. (100 Maneiras is ranked #2.) It is one of a handful of restaurants that gets mentioned in multiple Lisbon guides and articles. We sat directly under the cloud in the photo — the cloud slowly rotates. Alma is sleek, but combined the best qualities of chic that we experienced the previous evening in Largo, with more of the intimacy of 100 Maneiras.

While 100 Maneiras served their excellent bread in a homey burlap satchel, Alma’s bread service was more elegant and elaborate and included salt-dusted flatbreads, herb-topped focaccia and a crusty white bread along with an excellent olive oil. Alma offers two prix fixe menus. One is a “traditional” menu by Almas standards — a sort of “best of” menu — and the other more avant-garde. Christina and I opted for the former and Noah the latter. At dinner’s end, we all agreed we preferred the more traditional Alma menu.

Everyone began with an amuse bouche of seared scallop, cauliflower puree and salmon roe. An amuse bouche — literally “amuses or entertains the mouth” – is a small sort of pre-dinner course, plated and more substantial than an hors d’oeuvre and less substantial than a “first course.” Our amuse-bouche set the tone for the artful and delicious meal that followed. It did occur to me that as lovely and delicious as this was, I think of cauliflower as a distinctively winter vegetable though here we were in early June. To me, serving food that is in sync with the season is fundamental to fine dining.

With our amuse bouche we greatly enjoyed a crisp Filipa Pato 3B Sparkling Rose. Filipa Pato is a premium Portuguese wine maker. The 3B stands for Barraida, the region the wine is produced that sits just south of the famous Douro region and the mix of Bical white grapes and Barga red grapes that make up the wine. It was an elegant start to an elegant meal.

I loved our first course. A small piece of pan-seared cod filet was nestled on a chickpeas puree, spinach and roasted tomato and surrounded by chickpeas with just the barest amount of broth at the bottom of the pool. Partly what made this dish so enjoyable was that the chickpeas puree, spinach and roasted tomato are hidden by the cod filet and you only discover them once you have started eating. Food can be fun when not everything is revealed from the beginning.

I know very little about Portuguese wine. I simply asked the wine waiter to pick local wines for us that were neither the least or most expensive and that worked with what we ordered. With this course we had a 2010Reisling from Qunita de Sant’Ana, Marfa. 

Sous-vide cooking is all the rage in the exalted world of gastronomy. Sous-vide translates in French to “under vacuum.” The food to be cooked is vacuum sealed in a plastic bag. It is then submerged in a temperature controlled water bath at relatively low constant temperature for a long period. The goal is to evenly cook the food throughout while retaining all the food’s essential moisture and flavor. The pork loin was held at 154 degrees Farenheit for 24 hours. Before serving it was quickly finished in 400 degree oven to create a slight crust. The result was a tender piece of meat uniformly pink throughout but for its dark outer robe. Our pork loin, served on slate, was accompanied by sweet potato puree complete with dramatic sweep, bok choy, orange segments and roasted squash. All very good. Not great.

The wine was a red blend: 2007 Lima Mayer Red Blend from Alentejano  includes Syrah, Petite Verdot and Cabernet Sauvignon

The highlight of Noah more avant-garde entrée was a stylish take on stuffed rigatoni, standing guard around a beef filet. There is an aspect of fine dining for me that is scouting for ideas. I loved how they served the rigatoni and made a mental note to try to use it or some upcoming Frog Commissary catered event.

Following our “entrée,” we were served a tangerine sorbet with fresh tangerine segments in bottom.

Our choice of dessert was a warm pear tart with goat cheese ice cream, raspberry, blueberry sliced in half, micro purple and green mint. The pear tart was perfectly executed, though seemed more appropriate for fall or winter. As an at-home ice cream maker, I was thrilled with the goat cheese ice cream.

But the detail I loved most was the severed blueberry that leaned against the raspberry. Yes, a bit precious, but it worked for me. I never thought to cut a blueberry in half to serve it. Something else to remember.

Dinner ended with chocolate truffles and a tiny chocolate cake. Overall it was a wonderful dinner. The second best we had during our Lisbon holiday. It was not quite up to the calvalcade of flavors we experienced at 100 Manieras, nor did it have the same warmth and slightly frantic enthusiasm. In fairness, that was not Alma’s goal. 100 Maneiras provides a 10 course tasting menu and several of the course had multiple tastes. Because it was all well-paced and the food at a uniform high level, the experience was not overwhelming. Alma provided refined dining in a comfortably elegant setting.

Alma
Calcada Marques de Abrantes, 92, Phone: 213 96 3527

What do Lisbon restaurants cost?
You can eat inexpensively in Lisbon. That was not our objective. Christina and Noah enjoy and appreciate great food.  Of course, so do I. It is a core pleasure of traveling. When we dine out we do not focus on price — except when it comes to wine. I suspect that expensive dining in Lisbon is less expensive than comparable restaurants in other European capitals or New York and comparable to Philadelphia. Certainly a part of the cost is the US Dollar to Euro exchange rate at about $1.40US to the Euro. Thanks to Christina’s careful record keeping, here are the per person prices of our Lisbon dinners. Remember, much of this is a result of prodigious amounts of food and wine and we tip well. You can dine at any of these places for less. And I would say that 100 Maneiras 10 course tasting menu (the only menu they offer) was a bargain at 35 Euros — about $50.

Per person with all amounts in US dollars. Day One: 100 Maneiras $142 Day Two: Mercado do Peixe $72 and Largo $78 Day Three: Alma $91 Day 4: SeMe $76 Day Five: 100 Maneiras $120

A Fado Adventure

Fado is to Lisbon’s music what sardines are to Lisbon’s food. Fado, which dates back to the early 1800’s, is a traditional form of music linked to the Portuguese word saudade which is a feeling of loss. Its lyrics and melodies are mournful. Throughout Bairro Alto and Alfama are fado clubs and bars. Some of the larger venues incorporate full restaurants and you can make an evening of fado and dinner. These tend to be more directed to tourists though may feature leading fado performers. We opted for something more authentic.

Because we had to make an early dinner reserevation, the night was still reasonably young when we departed Alma. And since fado does not really heat up until round 11 PM, the time was right. We had asked at 1 de Miao where to find fado, explaining that we did not want a large, touristy venue. He suggested a small fado bar in Bairro Alto named A Tasca do Chico. (I had previously reported that this advice came from 100 Maneiras, but looking at my notes suggests otherwise. You probably don’t care about this correction but I like to keep the record straight.) A tasca is an inexpensive bar. So we took a cab from the Santos neighborhood of Alma back to Bairro Alto to hunt for Tasca do Chico. When we found a nearly empty tasca, we discovered that they offer fado on Monday and Wednesday evenings. And since this was Thursday evening, no fado. They did suggest we visit their “sister” establishment in Alfama where there was Thursday night fado.

We took a cab to the lower reaches of Alfama. It turned out that the Feast of St. Anthony celebration began in earnest this evening — Thursday. As we drove along the river through Baixa and into Alfama, we passed expanses of amusement rides and the other trappings of celebration. The cab suggested we get out at a small square at the base of Alfama that included a series of food stands as driving up into Alfama is difficult.

This is the view as we walked past the square and began the trek up the narrow streets of Alfama in search of fado.

Wherever you turned, people were celebrating.

Naturally, grilled sardines featured prominently.

A ten minute walk brought us to Alfama’s Tasca do Chico. It was a small, dark, packed and friendly bar. We arrived around 10:30 PM. Apparently there are different levels of fado singers ranging from highly regarded and well-paid professionals who work in the large fado venues to less established professionals and serious amateurs. Fado bars like the one we were in had several of whom we assume were the less established professionals. It turned out they also provided a sort of “open mike” for amateurs.

Sharing tables is apparently a fado ethic. We found three seats at a table in the rear across from the service bar. Our table mates were a dad, mom and 13-year-old daughter — spending a night out with her parents because Friday was a national holiday. And thus began our fado adventure. Dad was especially friendly and though he spoke little to no English and we spoke little to no Portuguese (despite my Peace Corps training in Brazil some 43 years ago), he engaged us — and especially Christina in long and animated conversation. First, he loved fado. He grew up in Alfama and though he no longer lives here, he returns often…for fado. His wife was no less friendly, but was less willing to engage in the succession of words and hand signals that were the basis of his conversation with Christina. They invited us to share their food – delicious fresh cooked spicy sausage. We bought them drinks. We learned of his life, that his wife’s name was also Christina,and about his grown children. Our conversation took place between fado sets. Though the photo above is not great, perhaps you can make out the gentleman standing in the center. He was both the emcee and prime singer. For us, the most exciting part of the evening was when our table mate and new friend arose and took center stage and sang. You just never know what’s going to happen when you walk into a fado bar.

Tasca do Chico
Rua dos Remedios, 83, Alfama
Also, Rua do Diario de Notecias, 39, Bairro Alto

By day, our Bairro Alto neighborhood was sleepy. Night was quite another story. And especially Thursday night at the start of the Festival of St. Anthony. Upon returning home around 12:30AM, I stood on our small second floor balcony overlooking the narrow street and watched a continuous wave of mostly young people pour into Bairro Alto — attracted by the one another and the neighborhood’s bars, restaurants. On our block alone there were more than a thousand people. It was interesting to get up in the morning, return to the balcony to see the street littered with abundant debris from the night’s revelry and then the efficient crew of blue-clad street cleaners sweep and wash down the street. By mid-morning Rua do Norte was returned to its quiet and tidy self.

Coming on Day Four: A trip to Cascais and Sintra and dinner at Sea Me.

Thank you visiting,

Steve
Your At Home Coach

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under My Life, On the Road

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s