Tag Archives: Entrees: Fish & Seafood

On the Table: Farm Stands of Northern Chester & Montgomery Counties, PA

At dinner’s end, with guests gone and a tired me sitting on the couch, Christina nicely extolled a wonderful dinner. While I appreciated her compliments, I expressed that this dinner was not a culinary triumph that required any great skill. I asserted, as I often do, that preparing a nice meal is more a matter of aspiration and planning than it is any great skill. You could have prepared this dinner.

Here is the slightly ridiculous haul from my drive through Northern Chester & Montgomery Counties. My farm stand shopping is a matter of faith. I have faith that when I get home I will find good uses for all that I have purchased over the week.

Here was my mostly Northern Chester & Montgomery County Menu:

Hors d’oeuvres
Roast marinated sweet & hot peppers with grilled bread
Deviled eggs
Soppressetta from DiBruno’s
Cerviche of diver scallops with coriander

Dinner
Cold Beet Soup with Cucumbers, Sour Cream & Dill

Tomato & Red Leaf Lettuce Salad

Grilled Shiso-marinated Swordfish
Creamy Corn Salad
Grilled Wax Beans

Cherry Grove Farm Toma Primavera

Peach Sorbet with Blackberries & Doughnut Peaches

Dinner began at 7 PM with the Blanc de Blanc Champagne from J.Maki’s Chester County winery. Everyone agreed it was excellent by any standard — not just excellent for being a local champagne.

Light hors d’oeuvres included roast, marinated sweet and hot pepper, deviled eggs and a DiBruno’s house-made soppressetta. The deviled eggs includes mayonnaise, mustard, a tiny dice or cornichon, fresh chives and topped with sweet smoked Spanish paprika. Frankly, the roasted peppers were a pain to peel — but they were possibly the unexpected hit of the evening. I bought them at a stand in a residential street from a “backyard” farmer whose mode of transport was a golf cart rather than a tractor. The peppers were arrayed in little plastic baskets like we use to serve burgers at Frog Burger — $1 a basket, one red sweet and one hot green. But they were very thin-skinned peppers that were difficult to peel after I charred them in the broiler. I cut them into short, thin strips and tossed them in olive oil and garlic. They were served with grilled bread — something a bit different from fully crisp crostini. I plan to post a “How to Make Grilled Bread” Tip in the next week or so. DiBruno’s house-made dried sausages are a go-to easy hors d’oeuvres addition.

Another very easy hors d’oeuvres are sliced diver scallops — also know as dry scallops because they are not packed in that awful white liquid that lesser quality scallops can be packed. They are simply thin-sliced and “dressed” about a half hour before guests arrive with lime juice, olive oil, chives and crushed toasted coriander seed — plus a little sea salt and pepper. There is a similar recipe on page 149 of At Home using pink peppercorns.

Unlike recent weeks when dinner was served family style on the table — that is, on platters where guests helped themselves, this menu was a plated dinner.

This cold beet soup is the third cold soup I have done this month. As frequently noted, I am a fan of soups as meal starters. They are easy, do ahead and lend themselves to dressing up. Here, the soup is dressed up with a small dice of cucumber, a dollop of sour cream and fresh dill. To make the soup, I just peeled the beets, cut into similar-sized chunks, cooked in a corn stock with onion and garlic, pureed in a blender and flavored with red wine vinegar. Look for the recipe tomorrow.

The cold soup co-opted the first course that would likely included tomatoes so I added a small tomato salad to the menu. I picked up some beautiful red accented lettuce from the Z Farm stand on Rittenhouse Square in the morning. The tomatoes and sweet onion came from my trip as did the basil. So, this is just the lettuce, two slices of tomato, topped with small yellow pear and orange tomatoes — cut into half as even the smallest tomatoes should be — dressed with a little balsamic, very good olive oil, Maldon sea salt and fresh ground black pepper and topped with a basil chiffonade. Everything was ready to go to be plated well before guests arrived.

I had grilled fresh swordfish earlier in the week for Christina and she lobbied to have it again for our guests. Given my failure to locate duck or lamb or pork on my drive, I went for the swordfish. It was marinated in a little garlic, shredded shiso — a minty, grassy herb that I got from Z Farm and olive oil. It was grilled in my grill pan — good as any you would get off a backyard grill. Served with a properly trimmed lemon wedge. There is a similar recipe on page 198 in At Home. I decided to grill the yellow wax beans. Just lightly tossed in olive oil and grill. Here a grill pan is much better than an open grill as there is no place for the beans to fall. The grilling adds a dimension to the otherwise very simple beans. See At Home page 307 for Grilled Green Beans. And what’s the purpose of a summer’s dinner but for an excuse to eat corn. Here it’s shaved with just a little sweet red pepper for color and purple scallion. What was unusual about this corn salad is that I had some leftover home-made mayonnaise from the deviled eggs and felt that the plate could use something creamy so I dressed the corn salad in the mayonnaise. It was sweet and creamy with a little bite from the scallion. One does not frequently see a corn salad with a creamy dressing.

We served the J.Maki Viognier with dinner. Like the champagne, it was also excellent. If you are not familiar with Viognier’s — a varietal grape that typically not bone dry and with tropical fruit overtones. At Home owners check-out the wine chart on page 32.

Rather than a full blown and filling cheese course added to an already ample meal, I served just a little bit of a Toma Primavera from Lawrenceville, NJ’s Cherry Grove Farm. I would put this cheese up there with the world’s best cheeses. It is available at the Rittenhouse Square Farmer’s Market. It’s served with a little grilled bread.

Weaver’s peaches were ripe, sweet, spectacular and easy to handle freestones. I made a peach sorbet by simply pureeing a mix or yellow and white peaches — skin and all – them passing the puree through a strainer to remove the larger pieces of skin — adding a ginger-scented simple syrup and then freezing in my ice cream freezer. It is important to “temper” sorbet or ice cream before serving. That means removing it from the freezer so it has a chance to soften somewhat. The peach sorbet was served with a grilled half of a yellow doughnut peach. I used an apple corer to get the pit out while accenting the “doughnut.” These were brushed with honey from Jack’s Farm Stand of two weeks ago and olive oil and grilled. Blackberries provided a color and slightly sour counterpoint.

Prep and Service Strategy
I always counsel that the ideal is to begin planning a weekend dinner at least the weekend before and spread your tasks over time. My current schedule isn’t allowing me to do this, but here’s how I would approach this meal if I were you. The sorbet and roast marinated peppers the weekend before. (Be careful not to eat those wonderful peppers during the week!)  The cold beet soup early in the week. You can also make deviled eggs mid-week though I would not stuff them until Friday or Saturday. Shop on Thursday for everything else except the swordfish and scallops. On Friday, grill bread and store in air-tight bag, dice cucumbers and chop dill for soup, slice onions for tomato salad, rinse lettuce and store in damp towel, blanch yellow beans, make corn salad, chop garlic for swordfish marinade, make lemon wedges and remove pits from doughnut peaches. Friday also set the table and chill wine.

That leaves for Saturday during the day, slice scallops, marinate swordfish, grill yellow beans, slice small tomatoes and make basil chiffonade. Grill doughnut peaches. Place hors d’oeuvres on platters or bowls. Make sure you give yourself one relaxed hour before guests arrive. If you follow this schedule that will be easy.

To turn-out dinner: dress scallops, bowl and garnish soup, arrange and dress tomato salad, grill swordfish and plate entree, cut cheese and plate with grilled bread, plate sorbet with doughnut peach and peach sorbet.

I am not suggesting this is no effort. Nor am I suggesting you try to repeat this exact meal — though I believe you could. What I am suggesting is that by planning ahead and spreading out your tasks, this can all be fun and not a chore — including the shopping.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

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Chapter 11 — Fish & Seafood

Today’s preview is Chapter 11 — Fish & Seafood.  The chapter starts with Pecan-Crusted Tilapia with Ancho Sweet Potato Wedges and concludes with Panko-Crusted Sea Scallops with Creamed Corn & Pepper Sauce. In between are thirteen home entertaining-friendly fish and seafood recipes that offer a welcome alternative to meat and poultry.

People seem afraid to serve fish at home to guests, but I find that people really love fish and welcome the change.  I think Chapter 11 will end that fear. As with preparations throughout At Home, the focus is on do ahead. Most cookbooks are restaurant-based books that tend to treat fish as though the fish just had to leap out of the pan on to the table. Caterer’s have to think about fish differently — with a do ahead perspective. This past Saturday night we served 80+ perfectly cooked striped bass to a wedding party that offered guests a choice of fennel-crusted striped bass or the Wine-Braised Shortribs of beef of that we feature in Chapter 10.

Chapter 11 includes Four Seasons of Pan-Seared Salmon where my goal is to get you comfortable with the technique of pan-searing and provide four seasonally appropriate preparations.

This evening marks the start of Rosh Hashana — the Jewish New Year. Other than Passover — a holiday that falls in early spring, Rosh Hashana is the most popular Jewish family and friends food event.  At Home is all about entertaining friends and family. I look forward to At Home and this blog being an integral part of your next Rosh Hashana with lots of easy, do ahead and Rosh Hashana-appropriate recipes including this Scallion & Ginger Poached Salmon.

Scallion & Ginger-Poached Salmon
This recipe originally came from the kitchen of the wife of a good friend for whom we planned a 60th birthday brunch. It has become our poached salmon default recipe. We serve it with a sweet and sour cucumber and red onion salad.

do ahead Salmon can be poached up to six hours ahead and served at room temperature or gently reheated in a bit of the poaching liquid on the stove.

1-ounce piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1⁄2 cup chopped scallion, plus 1 small bunch cut into 3-inch pieces
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 cup white wine
1 cup water
3 pounds salmon filet, skinned

Cucumber and Red Onion Salad
2 cucumbers, peeled
1 red onion, peeled, cut into quarters and thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1⁄4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sugar
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon pepper

1 Combine ginger, garlic, chopped scallion, salt and pepper in a deep dish or casserole large enough to hold the salmon. Coat salmon in ginger mixture and allow it to marinate for 30 minutes.
2 Meanwhile, make cucumber salad: Cut cucumbers in half, lengthwise. Using a spoon, scrape out seeds and discard. Cut cucumbers into thin halfmoons. Combine with red onion, parsley, rice vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper in a bowl and mix well. Allow to sit at least 15 minutes before
serving.
3 Preheat oven to 400°. Line the bottom of a roasting pan with large scallion pieces to make a “raft” for the fish.
4 Set salmon on the raft. Pour white wine and water over fish. Cover pan with foil and roast until cooked through, about 20-30 minutes.

serves 6

A side note from Chapter 11:

Technique
Leave Food Irregular and Coarse
Most foods taste better when they look better, and a coarse, irregular appearance makes them look handmade, homier. Compare a salsa made —and made homogenous—in a food processor to one that’s been handchopped or made with a mortar and pestle. This principle of irregularlooking foods is true elsewhere. Bread sliced by hand is more appealing than bread sliced by machine. In a curry, torn cilantro looks more attractive than chopped, and it provides a burst of flavor that chopped cilantro does not. If you must use the admittedly very convenient food processor, do not overprocess. Pulsing will let you maintain variation and coarseness. Also, try to phase in your ingredients, adding some ingredients after you’ve processed most of the rest.

And another wonderful Pascal illustration:

Picture 1

Tomorrow: Chapter 12 — Meat & Poultry Entrees where I will feature one of my favorite recipes in At Home, Manou’s Boiled Chicken.

Regular blog readers may be getting tired of this part of the blog where I remind you of the limited amount of time to buy the book and receive a signed and numbered limited edition. Just doin’ my job! The books ship to me a week from tomorrow. We expect to begin sending them out some time between October 2 — 5. At the end of September we will end this pre-order special.

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Scallion & Ginger-Poached Salmon Recipe

This recipe originally came from the kitchen of the wife of a good friend for whom we planned a 60th birthday brunch. It has become our poached salmon default recipe. We serve it with a sweet and sour cucumber and red onion salad.

do ahead Salmon can be poached up to six hours ahead and served at room temperature or gently reheated in a bit of the poaching liquid on the stove.

1-ounce piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1⁄2 cup chopped scallion, plus 1 small bunch cut into 3-inch pieces
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 cup white wine
1 cup water
3 pounds salmon filet, skinned

Serve with Cucumber and Red Onion Salad
2 cucumbers, peeled
1 red onion, peeled, cut into quarters and thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley
1⁄4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
3 tablespoons sugar
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄4 teaspoon pepper

1 Combine ginger, garlic, chopped scallion, salt and pepper in a deep dish or casserole large enough to hold the salmon. Coat salmon in ginger mixture and allow it to marinate for 30 minutes.
2 Meanwhile, make cucumber salad: Cut cucumbers in half, lengthwise. Using a spoon, scrape out seeds and discard. Cut cucumbers into thin halfmoons. Combine with red onion, parsley, rice vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper in a bowl and mix well. Allow to sit at least 15 minutes before
serving.
3 Preheat oven to 400°. Line the bottom of a roasting pan with large scallion pieces to make a “raft” for the fish.
4 Set salmon on the raft. Pour white wine and water over fish. Cover pan with foil and roast until cooked through, about 20-30 minutes.

serves 6

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