Tag Archives: Passover

Matzo Brei Recipe

Think of matzo brei as Jewish French toast in which matzo – substituting for bread — gets soaked in an egg custard and cooked in butter. Passover, which officially lasts seven days, forbids observant Jews from eating leavened products such as bread. Even less observant Jews frequently abstain from eating bread during Passover. Matzo Brei (rhymes with bye) is the classic Passover breakfast. It’s too bad matzo brei does not appear beyond Passover as it is great any time of the year – whether or not you’re Jewish.

Matzo Brei
Here, the matzo pancake’s custard is sweetened and flavored with cinnamon and sugar that is also sprinkled on top. Serve with optional warmed maple syrup on the side. This recipe calls for making a large pancake and cutting into quarters – two quarters per person. You can certainly make smaller individual pancakes. Your goal is to have a crisp and brown exterior with a softer, custardy interior.

Do Ahead You can make Matzo Brei up to 30 minutes in advance and hold, lightly covered, in a 225 degree oven until ready to serve. Make sure you do not fully cover and seal as pancake will steam and you will lose its crisp pancake exterior.

2 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
½ cup milk, whole preferred
¼ teaspoon salt
3 matzo sheets, plain and unsalted
2 tablespoons butter, divided
2 ounces maple syrup, optional

1 In a small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon and mix well. Reserve.
2 To make custard mixture In a medium bowl combine eggs, milk, salt and 1 tablespoon cinnamon and sugar mix. Whisk well to combine.
3 Tempering and soaking matzo Run tap water until hot. Run water over matzo sheet until damp but not really wet. Your goal is to soften matzo and begin breaking it down, but not get it dripping wet. You want the matzo to absorb the milk-egg mixture and the wetter it is with water, the less custard will be absorbed. But you need the initial wetting to get the process of absorption started. Repeat with balance of matzo sheets. Crumble matzo into egg-milk mix and push down to absorb custard. You want matzo pieces to be of variable and not homogeneous in size. Absorbing custard could take 10 to 15 minutes. Push matzo down into custard as needed. Don’t be concerned if matzo is not evenly moist as that unevenness makes for a pleasing texture to pancake.
4 Cooking Matzo Brei Using approximately 10-inch sauté or omelet pan with gently slopping sides, heat 1 tablespoon butter over moderate heat until foam subsides.  Pour soaked matzo with any residual custard into pan and with a broad spatula, push down to form a pancake. Cook until bottom is browned and bottom of pancake is set and firm. You may need to lower heat if bottom browns too quickly before pancake sets. Using spatula around and under pancake, loosen pancake from pan so that it can slide around. Using a dinner plate, flip pancake on to plate so the browned bottom side is now facing up. Don’t worry if pancake creases a little, just try to straighten it. Add additional 1 tablespoon butter to pan and when foam subsides, slide pancake back into pan and cook until bottom browned and pancake firm and fully set.  If you are timid about flipping, you can pre-heat your broiler and finish cooking by holding pan under broiler until top is browned and set. If making more than one pancake, transfer to cookie sheet and hold in 225 degree oven until ready to serve.
5 To serve Cut pancake into quarters and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar mix. If using optional maple syrup, place in pitcher and warm in microwave before serving.

Each pancake serves 2

Matzo soaks in custard until nearly all the custard is absorbed. Push matzo down into custard as needed. Don’t worry if there is still some residual custard remaining. Just pour it all into the pan.

Once butter’s foam has subsided, pour soaked matzo into pan and push down to form a pancake. The key is to brown the outside and get it crispy while just having the custardy interior set while staying moist. Matzo Brie should not be dry inside. If it seems to be cooking too quickly — by which I mean the bottom is browning before the pancake is setting — reduce heat.  If you reduce the heat too much it will be difficult to brown and crisp the outside while maintaining a moist inside.

Here’s a simple way to “flip” the pancake. Once the bottom is browned and set, use spatula to loosen pancake so that it slides around. Flip pancake on to waiting plate. Don’t worry if it gets a little creased. Just try to straighten pancakes as best you can. As my mother used to say, “It all gets mixed up in your stomach!” Next…

Add butter to pan again and when foam subsides, slide pancake back into pan with cooked side facing up. Continue cooking until bottom is browned and the custard and matzo are set, but not fully dry.

Once again, use your spatula to loosen pancake and slide off on to waiting plate or cutting board. You can cut it into quarters with two quarters being a serving. Sprinkle generously with cinnamon and sugar mix and/or serve with warmed maple syrup.


If you are making several, slide on to cookie sheet and hold in 225 degree oven until you have made all of your Matzo Brei.

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Matzo Brei

Note: Some last minute Passover advice follows the recipe. So, if you are not interested in the recipe, skip ahead.

Think of matzo brei as Jewish French toast in which matzo – substituting for bread — gets soaked in an egg custard and cooked in butter. Passover, which officially lasts seven days, forbids observant Jews from eating leavened products such as bread. Even less observant Jews frequently abstain from eating bread during Passover. Matzo Brei (rhymes with bye) is the classic Passover breakfast. It’s too bad matzo brei does not appear beyond Passover as it is great any time of the year – whether or not you’re Jewish.

Matzo Brei
Here, the matzo pancake’s custard is sweetened and flavored with cinnamon and sugar that is also sprinkled on top. Serve with optional warmed maple syrup on the side. This recipe calls for making a large pancake and cutting into quarters – two quarters per person. You can certainly make smaller individual pancakes. Your goal is to have a crisp and brown exterior with a softer, custardy interior.

Do Ahead You can make Matzo Brei up to 30 minutes in advance and hold, lightly covered, in a 225 degree oven until ready to serve. Make sure you do not fully cover and seal as pancake will steam and you will lose its crisp pancake exterior.

2 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
½ cup milk, whole preferred
¼ teaspoon salt
3 matzo sheets, plain and unsalted
2 tablespoons butter, divided
2 ounces maple syrup, optional

1 In a small bowl, combine sugar and cinnamon and mix well. Reserve.
2 To make custard mixture In a medium bowl combine eggs, milk, salt and 1 tablespoon cinnamon and sugar mix. Whisk well to combine.
3 Tempering and soaking matzo Run tap water until hot. Run water over matzo sheet until damp but not really wet. Your goal is to soften matzo and begin breaking it down, but not get it dripping wet. You want the matzo to absorb the milk-egg mixture and the wetter it is with water, the less custard will be absorbed. But you need the initial wetting to get the process of absorption started. Repeat with balance of matzo sheets. Crumble matzo into egg-milk mix and push down to absorb custard. You want matzo pieces to be of variable and not homogeneous in size. Absorbing custard could take 10 to 15 minutes. Push matzo down into custard as needed. Don’t be concerned if matzo is not evenly moist as that unevenness makes for a pleasing texture to pancake.
4 Cooking Matzo Brei Using approximately 10-inch sauté or omelet pan with gently slopping sides, heat 1 tablespoon butter over moderate heat until foam subsides.  Pour soaked matzo with any residual custard into pan and with a broad spatula, push down to form a pancake. Cook until bottom is browned and bottom of pancake is set and firm. You may need to lower heat if bottom browns too quickly before pancake sets. Using spatula around and under pancake, loosen pancake from pan so that it can slide around. Using a dinner plate, flip pancake on to plate so the browned bottom side is now facing up. Don’t worry if pancake creases a little, just try to straighten it. Add additional 1 tablespoon butter to pan and when foam subsides, slide pancake back into pan and cook until bottom browned and pancake firm and fully set.  If you are timid about flipping, you can pre-heat your broiler and finish cooking by holding pan under broiler until top is browned and set. If making more than one pancake, transfer to cookie sheet and hold in 225 degree oven until ready to serve.
5 To serve Cut pancake into quarters and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar mix. If using optional maple syrup, place in pitcher and warm in microwave before serving.

Each pancake serves 2

Matzo soaks in custard until nearly all the custard is absorbed. Push matzo down into custard as needed. Don’t worry if there is still some residual custard remaining. Just pour it all into the pan.

Once butter’s foam has subsided, pour soaked matzo into pan and push down to form a pancake. The key is to brown the outside and get it crispy while just having the custardy interior set while staying moist. Matzo Brie should not be dry inside. If it seems to be cooking too quickly — by which I mean the bottom is browning before the pancake is setting — reduce heat.  If you reduce the heat too much it will be difficult to brown and crisp the outside while maintaining a moist inside.

Here’s a simple way to “flip” the pancake. Once the bottom is browned and set, use spatula to loosen pancake so that it slides around. Flip pancake on to waiting plate. Don’t worry if it gets a little creased. Just try to straighten pancakes as best you can. As my mother used to say, “It all gets mixed up in your stomach!” Next…

Add butter to pan again and when foam subsides, slide pancake back into pan with cooked side facing up. Continue cooking until bottom is browned and the custard and matzo are set, but not fully dry.

Once again, use your spatula to loosen pancake and slide off on to waiting plate or cutting board. You can cut it into quarters with two quarters being a serving. Sprinkle generously with cinnamon and sugar mix and/or serve with warmed maple syrup.


If you are making several, slide on to cookie sheet and hold in 225 degree oven until you have made all of your Matzo Brei.

Last Minute Passover Advice
Hopefully you have followed the advice featured in Part 1 of At Home regarding how to organize your home entertaining. Here’s some highlights:

Your goal is one relaxed hour prior to your guest’s arrival. If you are working today and today is your seder, that might be difficult, but aim for some relaxed time — maybe fifteen minutes. Also, remember that home entertaining is a team sport so make sure the team helps out. Run and empty your dishwasher and wash and put away as many dirty pots, pans, bowls, etc. as you can. You want to start with clear and empty counters. Stash away things like toaster ovens and food processors that may be on your counter but not used for your meal. Post your menu on a kitchen cabinet so you have a “cheat sheet” for your meal. Ideally, pull and label all of your platters and bowls so you know what goes in what. Pre-platter everything you can in advance. Review At Home’s Page 22 as to how best to organize your “Back of House.” Here’s a key: Do not pile dirty things into your sink, rather on the counter adjacent to your sink. That’s because once your sink is full your sunk. Keep the sink available to rinse and wash — not stack.

Some advice for guests: The kitchen is not for chatting. Very important things occur in the kitchen and if you are not there to help make those things happen, stay out of the kitchen. If you are bringing flowers, bring them in a vase already arranged. The last thing you host needs is to stop and arrange flowers.

When it’s all over and guests are gone, make sure to take a moment to give yourself a pat on the back for a job well-done. By entertaining at home you have made an important connection to friends and family that will sustain you and your guests long after memories of the food served.

Best wishes for a Happy Passover.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

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Shephardic Charoset Recipe

Shephardic Charoset
As most American Jews – including yours truly — trace their roots to Eastern Europe, most of our Passover charosets are based on the fresh apples of the Ashkenazi tradition. The Sephardic charoset is based on dried fruit and has the advantage of being able to prepare well ahead. You may substitute pomegranate juice for the red wine. You need lots of different dried fruit for this, but you can buy just what you need from the bulk food bins of health food stores or Whole Foods. If you buy the individual packets you will likely have more dried fruit than you need. Resist making a larger batch as a little Shepardic charoset goes a long way. Leftover dried fruit and nuts, mixed together, makes for a welcome after dinner sweet snack with coffee at a future meal. Try adding some chocolate chips to your after-dinner snack mix.

Do Ahead May be prepared up to two days before serving. If adding fresh mint, add a few hours before serving.

½ cup dates, pits removed
¼ cup prunes, pits removed
¼ cup dried figs
¼ cup dried apples
¼ cup dried cranberries
¼ cup raisins
1 cup red wine
1 tablespoon honey
¼ cup pecans, whole or pieces
¼ cup walnuts, whole or pieces
¼ cup pistachios
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup chopped fresh mint, optional

1 Place dates, prunes, figs and apples on a generous cutting board. Chop until pieces are quite small – about the size of the cranberries and raisins. It may be easier to do this in batches – one fruit at a time. Dried fruit is sticky and not easy to chop. Transfer to medium mixing bowl. Add cranberries and raisins. Add wine and honey. Allow to sit until liquid is absorbed.
2 Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Combine pecans, walnuts and pistachios on rimmed baking sheet and bake until lightly toasted, about 10-15 minutes. Set aside to cool.
3 Coarsely chop nuts. Add to fruit mixture. Add salt. Add optional mint.

Yield 1 quart

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Sephardic Charoset

I would like to thank everyone who reached out to me with expressions of sympathy on the death of my mother. Your comments were helpful and healing.

Holiday meal traditions observed at home reconnect us to our roots and the generations that preceded us. Those roots too often get gobbled up by the day-to-day challenges of just getting through the days. It never ceases to amaze me that on the night of the first seder, Jews around the world are experiencing a giant dine-in — gathered and sharing essentially “the same meal” simultaneously — and have been for thousands of years.

Our holiday traditions are filled with flavor memories. With good reason, we repeat these memories, and innovate at the risk of the wrath of our dinner guests. With regard to Passover, brisket always feels de rigueur. But traditional holiday meals can get tiresome as we “arrest the usual suspects.” It is the courageous host who dares serve something new to family and friends who came expecting the same old thing! I encourage you to be such a courageous host.

A simple way to introduce something new is to work around the edges of the menu. Not the brisket, but the accompaniments like this year’s Asparagus with Mustard Butter in place of the the usual string beans. Or At Home’s Upside-down Caramelized Matzo Kugel. A very simple way to innovate is to simply add something new without taking anything away. Last Passover my sister-in-law Nancy added a delicious Sephardic charoset to the seder table. It provided a rich and complex counter-point to the crisp, simple freshness of the traditional chopped apples and walnuts that she also served.

Shephardic Charoset
As most American Jews – including yours truly — trace their roots to Eastern Europe, most of our Passover charosets are based on the fresh apples of the Ashkenazi tradition. The Sephardic charoset is based on dried fruit and has the advantage of being able to prepare well ahead. You may substitute pomegranate juice for the red wine. You need lots of different dried fruit for this, but you can buy just what you need from the bulk food bins of health food stores or Whole Foods. If you buy the individual packets you will likely have more dried fruit than you need. Resist making a larger batch as a little Shepardic charoset goes a long way. Leftover dried fruit and nuts, mixed together, makes for a welcome after dinner sweet snack with coffee at a future meal. Try adding some chocolate chips to your after-dinner snack mix.

Do Ahead May be prepared up to two days before serving. If adding fresh mint, add a few hours before serving.

½ cup dates, pits removed
¼ cup prunes, pits removed
¼ cup dried figs
¼ cup dried apples
¼ cup dried cranberries
¼ cup raisins
1 cup red wine
1 tablespoon honey
¼ cup pecans, whole or pieces
¼ cup walnuts, whole or pieces
¼ cup pistachios
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup chopped fresh mint, optional

1 Place dates, prunes, figs and apples on a generous cutting board. Chop until pieces are quite small – about the size of the cranberries and raisins. It may be easier to do this in batches – one fruit at a time. Dried fruit is sticky and not easy to chop. Transfer to medium mixing bowl. Add cranberries and raisins. Add wine and honey. Allow to sit until liquid is absorbed.
2 Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Combine pecans, walnuts and pistachios on rimmed baking sheet and bake until lightly toasted, about 10-15 minutes. Set aside to cool.
3 Coarsely chop nuts. Add to fruit mixture. Add salt. Add optional mint.

Yield 1 quart

Tomorrow: Annette Fine’s Matzo Toffee Crunch

Design Within Reach Event Postponed
The event originally scheduled for Design Within Reach at 1708 Walnut Street has been postponed. Apologies for any inconvenience. We expect to re-schedule.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

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Chopped Chicken Livers & Mock “Chicken Livers”

This post includes recipes for both Chopped Chicken Livers and Mock “Chicken Livers.” Mock “Chicken Livers” is a vegetarian concoction with taste and texture remarkably similar to the real McCoy.

Sadly, old fashioned chopped chicken livers have fallen out of fashion and lost their place at our tables. Passover is the ideal time to rekindle your guests’ relationship with this traditional flavor. Easy to make ahead, chicken livers are the answer to what can I serve as a Passover hors d’oeuvres. As with most foods, do not serve cold from the refrigerator. Rather remove from refrigerator at least an hour before serving. You can dress up chicken livers with a little chopped fresh parsley on top.

Chopped Chicken Livers
Delicious any time, Passover provides an excellent reason to make and serve chopped chicken livers. They are simple to make and a treat that has fallen out of favor so people rarely get to enjoy them. For Passover, serve with Matzo. Otherwise, any sturdy cracker or crostini.  For a wonderful sandwich, chopped chicken liver on fresh rye bread with a lots of sliced onion.

Do ahead Livers may be made up to five days ahead and refrigerated. As with most foods, it is best not to serve chicken livers too cold. Remove from refrigerator at least an hour before serving.

1 pound chicken livers
2 cups medium chopped onion
6 tablespoons vegetable oil or rendered chicken fat,* divided
2 chopped hard-boiled eggs
1 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoons black pepper, freshly ground preferred

1 Trim away from livers and and discard any membrane and bits of green bile duct from livers. Place paper towels on cookie sheet or rimmed baking sheet. Place chicken livers on towels and place additional paper on top to absorb moisture.
2 Heat 3 tablespoons oil in medium sauté pan over moderate heat until hot. Add onions and cook, stirring frequently until deeply browned but take care not to burn. Lower heat as needed if onions are cooking too quickly and burning. Remove onions and set aside to cool.
3 Wipe out pan with paper towel. Add 3 tabblespoons oil and heat until hot. You will cook the chicken livers in two batches so that they can cook without being crowded. If too crowded they will steam rather than sauté. Cook on one side about 2 minutes and turn and cook on other side. You want livers that are nicely browned on the outside but still pink in the inside. Remove livers to cool. Repeat with second batch of livers adding additional oil, as needed.
4 Once livers are cool, chop coarsely with a knife. You want to maintain some texture so do not place in food processor. Transfer chopped livers to mixing bowl. Add onions, chopped egg, salt and pepper. Mix well and chill.

Yield 3 cups

*Rendered chicken fat, aka schamltz may be made by cooking chicken fat and skin over low heat until fat melts and skin renders its fat. Remove skin and use in place of oil.

I liked the recipe we developed for Mock “Chicken Livers” so much that it made it all the way to the final cut of hors d’oeuvres recipes in At Home. But At Home is alive. By that, I mean it is unlike just publishing a book and distributing it impersonally through bookstores and it ends there.  With this At Home blog and At Home Online, At Home’s recipe library can grow over time.  I can have an ongoing relationship with you and  the At Home community.

Mock “Chicken Livers”
Mock “chicken livers” look and taste remarkably like genuine chicken livers though, of course, they are vegetarian. If using for Passover, serve with matzo. Otherwise, any cracker or crostini will do.

Do Ahead May be made up to five days ahead and refrigerated.

2 cups onions, medium dice – about 3/4 pound
1/2 cup medium diced celery
1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
2 cups sliced domestic mushrooms – about 4 ounces
1/4 cup water
1/2 cups string beans, blanched and diced – about 4 ounces
1/3 cup walnuts, toasted
2 hard boiled eggs
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh  thyme, optional
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
1 Toast walnuts on rimmed baking sheet in 350 degree oven until they begin to darken. Remove and cool. Pulse in food processor until finely ground. Set aside.
2 In medium sauté pan over moderate heat, combine onions, celery and garlic in 2 tablespoons of oil until mixture is golden and lightly caramelized. Frequently stir or toss mixture to ensure uniform coloring. This could take 30-40 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside.
3 In same pan, sauté mushrooms in 2 tablespoons oil over moderate until dark. Remove mushrooms from pan. Add water and deglaze pan by scraping any remnants from sauté of onion mix and mushrooms. Reserve water.
4 Combine in food processor onion-garlic-celery mix, mushrooms, deglazing water, string beans, chopped walnuts, hard-boiled eggs, thyme, salt and pepper. Process until smooth.

Yield 1 pint

Note: This can be made richer by substituting butter for oil.

Matzo Ball Soup Note
Some readers have suggested adding more chicken parts to At Home’s Matzo Ball Soup recipe. By all means if you would like a richer soup, you can double the amount of chicken parts called for in the recipe. If you already made your chicken soup, you can enrich it by adding additional chicken parts to your chicken soup, simmering for 30 minutes and straining out the additional parts. Allow to chill in refrigerator and skim off any chicken fat that rises to surface and congeals.

Design Within Reach Event Postponed
My event planned for this Thursday, March 25th at Design Within Reach has been postponed. It will be re-scheduled.

Upcoming Recipes
Next up:  Shepardic Charoset.

A Chef’s Table
I was featured on Jim Coleman’s A Chef’s Table this past Saturday with a segment on Passover entertaining. Here’s the link to A Chef’s Table’s website and the podcast.

Ordering At Home for Your Passover or Easter House Gift

You can still order At Home to give as a welcome house gift for your Passover or Easter host. To order.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertaining at Home, Holidays, Recipes

Asparagus with Mustard Butter

This recipe works well for either Passover or Easter. The general technique of pre-blanching vegetables and quickly re-heating them in butter or oil just prior to serving is one that every home entertainer should know.

Asparagus with Mustard Butter
One of the challenges of serving a crowd is getting everything hot at once. This can be especially challenging with the green vegetable. Green vegetables are easy…to overcook. Restaurants and caterers always pre-cook (blanche) their green vegetables and then typically sauté them quickly in butter or oil to heat and flavor. The following approach to asparagus will work for any strudy green vegetable such as broccoli or string beans. Cutting asparagus into 1-inch lengths makes them easier to serve and eat though you sacrifice some of the drama of the long stalks. You can certainly take this same approach to whole asparagus. While these days of jet vegetable travel keep asparagus in neighborhood markets year ‘round, they are a quintessentially a spring vegetable and so lend themselves to Passover and Easter dinners. Asparagus have an affinity for mustard and are done here with mustard butter.

2/3 cup chopped shallots
½ cup chopped parsley
2 pounds asparagus, thick stalks preferred or any sturdy green vegetable
4 ounces unsalted butter
1/2 cup white wine
½ cup Dijon-style mustard
1 teaspoons salt, plus salt for blanching asparagus
½ teaspoon black pepper

Do Ahead Asparagus may be blanched one day ahead and refrigerated. Mustard butter may be made and held in sauté pan up to five hours ahead.

1 Preparing asparagus Snap asparagus several inches from the bottom where the woody part meets the green part. Discard this woody end. If asparagus are thick you may lightly peel from just below the “cluster top” to the bottom. By removing the peel, asparagus become more tender. A reason I prefer thick asparagus is they allow for peeling while with thin asparagus there isn’t enough asparagus stalk to peel. Next, cut asparagus into about 1-inch lengths on a bias. A bias is an angle. Bias cut simply means cut on an angle. It does nothing for flavor, but provides a more interesting and intentional look. To do this simply line up a few asparagus and cut. Don’t worry if every piece is not the exact same length.
2  Blanching asparagus In a medium pot, bring generous amount of salted water to boil. Have a bowl of ice water ready. Add asparagus to pot and cook for a short time until rawness is gone, but asparagus is still crisp. Cooking length will vary depending on thickness of asparagus. It will take from about a minute for thin asparagus to 2 to 3 minutes for thick. It is best to pull out an asparagus and sample as you go. When cooked, immediately pour water through a strainer and transfer cooked asparagus to ice bath to stop cooking and set color.
3 Making mustard butter Heat butter in a medium sauce or sauté pan over moderate heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring frequently until translucent. Add white wine and mustard and cook to reduce and thicken liquid to consistency of heavy cream. Set aside until ready to add asparagus.
4  To finish Heat mustard butter over moderate heat. Add asparagus and cook over moderate heat until hot. Add parsley and toss with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Serves 6-8

Upcoming Recipes
Coming tomorrow or Wednesday: Chopped Chicken Livers and Mock “Chicken Livers.” Later in the week, Shepardic Charoset.

A Chef’s Table
I was featured on Jim Coleman’s A Chef’s Table this past Saturday with a segment on Passover entertaining. Here’s the link to A Chef’s Table’s website and the podcast.

Ordering At Home for Your Passover or Easter House Gift

You can still order At Home to give as a welcome house gift for your Passover or Easter host. To order.

Thank you for visiting.

Steve
Your Home Entertaining Coach

Leave a comment

Filed under Holidays, Recipes